Promote normal uric acid levels naturally

Tart Cherry Comfort (120 capsules, 30-day supply) | uric acid vitamins & supplements

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New Tart Cherry Comfort® gets to the root cause of excess uric acid

  • Supports normal uric acid levels
  • Promotes comfortable, healthy joints
  • Promotes a normal inflammatory response
  • Helps maintain normal blood pressure
  • Supports healthy iron levels

New Tart Cherry Comfort naturally helps promote normal uric acid levels and supports healthy, comfortable joints. The combination of five powerful nutrients targets the root cause of excess uric acid without any side effects. New Tart Cherry Comfort gives you dosages of the following:

1. CherryPURE™ powder (1,000 mg) In a placebo-controlled study participants who consumed tart cherry juice experienced reduced uric acid levels and lower CRP (C-reactive protein) and ESR (erythrocyte sedimentation rate), both markers of inflammation, than the placebo group.

In another study, participants who consumed 280 grams of cherries (about 45 cherries) saw a 14% drop in uric acid levels after only 5 hours. And CRP levels slightly decreased.

In my Tart Cherry Comfort formula I’ve included 1,000 mg of CherryPURE powder. It’s manufactured by a company right here in the U.S. called Shoreline Fruit. They use 43 grams of tart cherries to yield 1,000 mg of CherryPURE. Their unique processing and drying methods maintain the highest levels of the nutrients found in the fruit. The result is a pure cherry powder with no artificial ingredients. The extract is also GMO-free and meets U.S. Environmental Protection Agency pesticide residue allowances.

If you’re taking either of my joint pain formulas—Joint Advantage Gold or Joint Advantage CPR Advanced Relief and have uric acid concerns, it’s safe to add Tart Cherry Comfort to your daily regimen.

2. Vitamin C (500 mg), a powerful antioxidant that prevents free-radical damage. Studies suggest that vitamin C reduces blood levels of uric acid. In fact, in a double-blind, placebo-controlled randomized trial, 184 subjects were given either placebo or 500 mg of vitamin C (ascorbate) daily for 2 months. By the end of the study, blood uric acid levels were significantly reduced in the vitamin C group, but not in the placebo group.

What’s more, vitamin C increased the kidney filtration rate when compared to the placebo group. It’s safe to say vitamin C helps your body to excrete excess uric acid and supports healthy kidney function.

3. Celery seed extract (150 mg), which contains a compound known as 3-n-butyl phthalide or 3nB for short. 3nB has natural diuretic properties that can help promote normal blood pressure, reduce inflammation, and promote joint comfort.

In a 12-week pilot study, subjects received 34 mg of proprietary celery extract standardized to contain 85% phthalides twice daily. Subjects experienced significant relief of aches and pains after 3 weeks, with most subjects experiencing maximum benefit after 6 weeks. Many subjects noticed a diuretic effect without altering the ratio of sodium to potassium in the blood.

In a larger study, test subjects received 75 mg of celery extract twice daily for three weeks. At this higher dose, subjects reported even better results than in the pilot study. Significant improvements were noted in mobility and quality of life.

4. Green coffee extract (250 mg), which contains chlorogenic acids that have been shown to reduce iron absorption. Evidence suggests that iron overload may contribute to high uric acid levels. In a recent study, researchers found that uric acid levels decreased with caffeinated and decaffeinated coffee intake.

5. Olive leaf extract (400 mg), the olive leaf’s soothing powers come from oleuropein, a potent antioxidant that has been shown to inhibit xanthine oxidase in vitro. Xanthine is a purine. As you may know; the higher the amount of purines, the more uric acid in your blood. During my travels to Mexico, I saw firsthand how traditional folk healers use olive leaves in tea to relieve joint discomfort with great success.

If you have uric acid issues and uncomfortable joints, I highly encourage you to try Tart Cherry Comfort. This exclusive five nutrient combination targets the root cause of excess uric acid, reduces inflammation, promotes healthy, comfortable joints, and supports normal blood pressure. I guarantee you’ll feel more comfortable and really enjoy life again.

These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. This product is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.

Ingredients and Dosage

Doctor’s Suggested Use: Take 4 capsules daily, 2 with breakfast and 2 with lunch or dinner.

Serving Size: 2 Capsules
Servings Per Container: 60

Ingredient Amount Per Serving % DV
Vitamin C (as ascorbic acid) 250 mg 417%
Tart Cherry Powder‡ (Prunus cerasus fruit) 500 mg *
Olive Extract (leaf) 200 mg *
Green Coffee Extract (bean) 125 mg *
Celery Extract (seed) 75 mg *

*Daily Value (DV) not established.

Other ingredients: Gelatin, microcrystalline cellulose, silicon dioxide, magnesium stearate

Note: Pregnant or lactating women should consult a health care professional before taking this product.
Keep out of reach of children.

‡CherryPURE™ is a trademark of Anderson Global.

Reviews

Displaying 1-5 of 5

WallaWalla

Reviewed on
2.0 out of 5 stars

I have tried a few different juice brands and only found one that really worked. But Tart Cherry Comfort works better and faster than that juice. I shared it (TCC) with a friend who has a worse case than mine and he is now a convert. Very effective product - Thank you

Wanderer

Reviewed on
5.0 out of 5 stars

My husband has not had (any problems from uric acid build-up) since he started using this product. He had a two before he used this product.

tallc23

Reviewed on
2.0 out of 5 stars

Well, for me it really didn't do what I wanted it to. Inflammation still remains the same,. .

OkieStateStephen

Reviewed on
5.0 out of 5 stars

For years I suffered from (high uric acid levels). Watching my diet just did not do the job for me. Then a doctor friend of mine suggested your Tart Cherry Comfort. I have not had one single bout in over a year with your product. Thank you so very much

Joesav

Reviewed on
5.0 out of 5 stars

I was having a huge problem with (uric acid build-up) which was causing tremendous pain in both my feet. After trying different medications an supplements. Dr Williams Tart Cherry was the only thing that brought relief I can now walk pain free. Thanks for such a wonderful product.

Science and Quality

Tart Cherry Powder (CherryPURE)

  • In a 2003 study, 280 grams of cherries (about 45 cherries) was given to 10 healthy women. Blood uric acid levels decreased by 14% after 5 hours and excretion of uric acid increased. CRP levels also decreased slightly.1
  • In a 2011 randomized, placebo-controlled crossover study, 10 participants consumed 8 oz/day of either 100% tart cherry juice or placebo beverage for 4 weeks, with a 2-week washout period between switching treatments. Although participants had normal uric acid levels, 7/10 participants displayed reduced serum uric acid levels after tart cherry juice consumption. The erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), an indicator of inflammation, was significantly lower with tart cherry juice treatment versus placebo.2

Vitamin C

  • In a comprehensive review of 13 randomized controlled trials of vitamin C supplementation in a total of 556 adults with normal kidney function, an average reduction of serum uric acid of .35 mg/dL was observed for an average dose of 500 mg/day for a median duration of 30 days.3
  • In a double-blind, placebo-controlled randomized trial, 184 subjects were given either placebo or 500 mg vitamin C (ascorbate) daily for 2 months. By the end of the study, blood uric acid levels were significantly reduced in the vitamin C group, but not in the placebo group (mean change -0.5 mg/dL vs. 0.09 mg/dL). Vitamin C also increased the kidney filtration rate when compared to the placebo group.4
  • In a population-based study, researchers measured dietary intake and serum uric acid concentrations in 1,387 men. Greater intakes of total vitamin C were significantly associated with lower serum uric acid concentrations. An inverse dose-response association was observed through vitamin C intake of 400-500 mg/d, and then reached a plateau. Greater vitamin C intake was associated with lower prevalence of high uric acid levels.5

Celery Extract

  • A celery seed extract standardized to contain 85% 3nB has been evaluated in the treatment of joint pain. In a 12-week pilot study, the 15 subjects received 34 mg of a proprietary celery seed extract standardized to contain 85% phthalides twice daily. Subjects experienced significant relief after 3 weeks of use. Most subjects achieved maximum benefit after 6 weeks of use. Many subjects noticed a diuretic effect, but no changes were noted in sodium and potassium balance.6
  • Based on the positive results of the pilot study, a larger 70 patient study had test subjects receive 75 mg of celery extract twice daily for three weeks. At this higher dosage, subjects reported even better results than in the pilot study. Statistically and clinically significant improvements were noted in mobility and quality of life. Subjects noted a diuretic effect but there were no changes in sodium and potassium balance.7

Green Coffee Extract

  • Increased coffee consumption has been shown to be inversely associated with the risk of high uric acid levels. An inverse association has also been found between decaffeinated-coffee consumption and high uric acid levels, which suggests that the non-caffeine components of coffee contribute to the effect.8,9
  • In the Nurses’ Health Study, 89,433 women were tracked over 26 years for their consumption of coffee—those who consumed more coffee had lower risk of high uric acid levels.9
  • A similar study of 45,869 men for 12 years demonstrated similar effects for both caffeinated and decaffeinated coffees, which was significant at coffee intakes over 4 cups a day.8
  • Using data from 14,758 participants in the Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, researchers found that serum uric acid level decreased with increasing coffee intake. Serum uric acid level associated with coffee intake of 4 to 5 and ≥ 6 cups daily was lower than that associated with no intake by 0.26 mg/dL and 0.43 mg/dL, respectively. Similarly, there was a modest inverse association between decaffeinated coffee intake and serum uric acid levels.10
  • Some evidence suggests that iron overload may contribute to high uric acid levels, and chlorogenic acids from coffee have been shown to reduce iron absorption.11 Green coffee extract is high in chlorogenic acids that are highly bioavailable.12

Olive Leaf Extract

  • Olive leaf extract has demonstrated strong antioxidant activity and inhibition of xanthine oxidase in vitro.13

1 Jacob RA, et al. J Nutr 2003;133:1826–9.
2 Martin KR, et al. FASEB 2011;25;339.2.
3 Juraschek SP, et al. Arthritis Care & Research 2011;63(9):1295–1306.
4 Huang HY, et al. Arthritis & Rheumatism 2005;52(6):1843–847.
5 Gao X, et al. J Rheumatol 2008;35(9):1853–8.
6 Soundarajan S, et al. School of Medicine, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia; 1991–2.
7 Venkat S, et al. Department of Orthopaedics, Kovai Medical Center and Hospitals, Coimbatore, India; 1995.
8 Choi HK, et al. Arthritis Rheum 2007;56:2049–55.
9 Choi HK and Curhan G. Am J Clin Nutr 2010;92:922–7.
10 Choi HK and Curhan G. Arthritis & Rheumatism 2007;57(5):816–21.
11 Hallberg L and Hulthen L. Am J Clin Nutr 2000;71:1147–60.
12 Farah A, et al. J Nutr 2008;138:2309–15.
13 Flemming J, et al. Phytomed 2010.

Product Quality