How Can I Reduce the Risk of Bone and Stress Fractures?

by Dr. David Williams
Filed Under: Q&As, Bone & Joint Health
Last Reviewed 02/06/2014

My 86-year-old active mother is having problems with bone fractures. She also has had stress fractures that seem to happen after she overdoes it around the house. Her doctor always puts her in a cast, but this seems to further weaken the affected area and we don't know what to do. What would you suggest?

 

With progesterone and the right nutritional support program for bone health, bone density can be increased up to 10 percent in just six months and continue to increase at an annual rate of 3 percent to 5 percent until it stabilizes and the levels are common to a 35 year-old woman! In fact, one study showed the same results in women ages 38 to 83.

As for stress fractures, there's a little screening trick that helps distinguish them from soft tissue injuries in the same area. During neurological examinations doctors frequently use the 258 Hz tuning forks to test for vibratory sensitivity.

This tuning fork can also be used to test for bone fractures. When vibrating and placed in contact with a fractured bone it will elicit pain. If the problem is soft tissue no pain will be involved. Although this is only a screening tool, it might help your doctor avoid having to put a cast on your mother every time she injures herself.

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